***This is an Interactive image*** Place your cursor in the image and click and drag to pan and tilt the view.
The Pan-NO-head first test pano

The Pan-NO-head
My first drawing of this is from late 2001, at some point during 2005 I started to machine one from aluminum. It got eaten by an end mill. Forward to 2011, I found 3d printing. I dug out my mini-cad drawing and brought it into TurboCad, made a few tweaks to it. Just before the new year I hit the print "button".

It works well for a prototype. Actually, it works exactly as I had envisioned.
Leaving the lens pivot ring attached to the lens means I only have to attach the yoke and plumb bob and I'm ready to shoot. It allows for enough tilt up to cover the zenith(barely), and makes shooting the nadir a breeze.

As with most things of this nature, there are obvious things..that aren't obvious until you have the item in hand. I have 2 revisions to make. One should have hit me in the face before I ever got this far. The other one was not so obvious.

This was my first test pano with it. I corrected one small stitching error in the railing. Other that that its straight up. I made no effort to keep the camera level from side to side. I used the index mark for 10° down for 6 around, I shot 2 zeniths 180° apart and 2 nadirs 90° apart.( I used photoshop to remove all of the Pan-No-head i could from the image I stitched with for the nadir)

The white squareish shape at the nadir is all you see of the Pan-NO-head

Top, front,right side, iso.
One screw for mounting
Index marks
Yoke and plumb bob
6 around @ -10°
2 around as far up as it goes @ 180°
2 straight down @ 90°
side view tilt up
side view tilt down
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After shooting a few panos with the Pan-No-Head there were revisions to make.
The first revision was to reduce the width of the yoke to 1/2of what it was. This reduced the square left at the nadir to 1/4 of what it was. It's still more than strong enough.

The next item isn't really a revision. I tried a demarkation plate on the ground to assist with the 60° interval for shooting. That did not work out. So I modeled a plumb bob with a cavity to hold a compass. It works well but it could stand to be a bit bigger and heavier.

The final revision to the Pan-No-Head was to shorten the pivot pins as much as possible. By tightening up some spaces and shortening a few things I managed to trim 10mm from the overall width. This makes it much easier to move the camera in and out of its bag with it in place. It also now fits on my tripod mounted panohead without having to turn or remove it. I also removed the index mark from the pivot as it is not needed.